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Old 08-05-2019, 02:50 PM   #41
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Just for the heck of it, I was curious how the 2019 Coachmen Crossfit 22C is plumbed, mostly because I want to have an idea how vulnerable it would be to freezing temperatures.

Based on measured temperatures taken early this spring, I suspect that the plumbing back behind the fridge/bathroom is the most vulnerable, and that the temperature of that plumbing will stay roughly half-way between outside air temp and inside heated air temp.

Here's a diagram of how the plumbing is routed in my coach, as best as I can determine:



The black lines denote wall cavities. Fresh tank and pump are under the couch.

All the plumbing is inside the coach, but much of it is not well insulated - instead it is in the wall cavities with variable amounts of insulation, some to the outside of the plumbing, some between the plumbing and the heated space.

All plumbing that crosses over from driver side to the passenger side galley is tucked in an enclosed partition under the front of the couch.

If I wanted to make the coach slightly more winter-tolerant, I would put disconnects on the bath side and leave those pipes dry in winter.

The 'D' model will be different, as may be coaches built earlier or later.
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Old 08-23-2019, 05:19 PM   #42
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Trying to do something useful with the space behind the drivers seat. On the Coachmen Crossfit/Beyond, Coachmen leaves about 12" space behind the drivers seat. This means that you can slide the drivers seat all the way back and still recline a bunch or else use the space for stuff.

To help keep the space from being a random pile of stuff - or more accurately- to help keep the random pile of stuff hidden, I built a small cabinet using riveted aluminium, 1/8" plywood covered with fuzzy grey speaker box fabric. It's strong enough to hold misc. stuff, but not strong enough to stand on. I'm using neoprene to cushion and pad against the coach walls and floor. I put lined plywood half-walls inside to stiffen the structure and to deaden noise if stuff bangs around in there.

The box is 12" wide x 14" tall x 20" deep. The height is so that water jugs and cleaning supplies fit inside, but low enough so the drivers seat still reclines somewhat.



To provide access to the random pile of stuff inside, I put a hinged doors on the top and front. The front door is held with a magnetic push-to-open latch.






I tried to make it blend in a bit, but probably could have done a better job fitting against the bathroom wall and perhaps shopped around for a slightly darker fabric.



I'm thinking that the space on top of the box will be used for a random pile of backpacks and duffel bags.
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Old 08-28-2019, 11:28 PM   #43
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That space is just begging for a litter-box, and then maybe a cat.

Are you a cat person???
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Old 08-29-2019, 04:33 AM   #44
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That space is just begging for a litter-box, and then maybe a cat.

Are you a cat person???


Nope - no cats. I'm allergic to them.

I'll figure out how to use the space above the box for hanging backpacks and stuff like that.
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Old 08-29-2019, 06:40 PM   #45
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@Michael, nicely done. Our LTV Free Spirit has a similar space. We put our covered trashcan there (about the size of your storage box), and the folded outdoor mat. Above are hooks to hang hats, jackets, packs.
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Old 09-20-2019, 06:51 PM   #46
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An update to the Forest River TSB - 225-0970 - It's now SuperSpring replacement.

https://dealers.forestriverinc.com/d...BDocuments.pdf

Seems as though SuperSpring has a shorter version of the SSA43 springs. The longer version interferes with the factory spring mounts and contacts the chassis even when installed per instructions and prior TSB.

This makes sense, as even with the springs properly positioned, I still hear some contact between the SuperSprings and the factory spring mounts.

--Mike
FYI -

I reached out to Coachmen and offered that I didn't think that my dealer was up to the task and that I'd prefer working with a local truck spring shop. They referred me to SuperSpring directly.

SuperSpring agreed that the local RV dealer wasn't the best choice - having worked with them on another swap. They shipped me the springs and a pair of big heavy C-clamps to use in the installation process. They were fine with me taking the Transit to a local spring shop and reimbursing me for the labor.

The springs shop did the swap w/o issues. The new springs might be designed differently, as the van rides a bit different. Not sure how to describe it, but it's possibly an improvement.
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Old 09-21-2019, 05:33 PM   #47
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Did you find any sites or you tube videos that explain how the various systems function. I have had several rv's and large coaches but, the crossfit/beyond seems complicated and the documentation is quite limited.
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Old 09-22-2019, 12:12 AM   #48
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Did you find any sites or you tube videos that explain how the various systems function. I have had several rv's and large coaches but, the crossfit/beyond seems complicated and the documentation is quite limited.
I think all the systems that Coachmen uses are off-the-shelf, not Coachmen specific, and certainly not any more complex than those on large coaches. So I don't think you need to focus exclusively on Crossfit/Beyond videos.
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Old 12-13-2019, 07:40 PM   #49
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we did it another way...
our dealer's shop didn't want to perform the work and after some initial nonsense we put our collective feet down and decided they would

after almost six months the parts were ordered and the work completed

we never did have any obvious problems other than the truck riding like a truck
now the truck rides somewhere between a car and a van...definitely not a one-ton truck

a noticeable improvement especially on the back roads we find ourselves on
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Old 06-09-2020, 02:39 AM   #50
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I use the StowAway SwingAway Frame with my own custom ebike platform. works well.

Bud
We'll be taking possession of a 2020 Beyond 22RB in the next few days. I was thinking about a Stowaway 2 since we had one on a Casita travel trailer and it worked well. I had wondered about the backup camera and if the trunk would block it.
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Old 06-09-2020, 03:02 AM   #51
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Hey,


Welcome to the Forums


I use a back up cam mounted up high on my 3rd brake light, it is angled down and helps me to keep from bashing the spare into a wall here at home


$70


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1




there are a few threads on cameras- and stowaways too


Mike
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Old 06-09-2020, 04:52 AM   #52
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We'll be taking possession of a 2020 Beyond 22RB in the next few days. I was thinking about a Stowaway 2 since we had one on a Casita travel trailer and it worked well. I had wondered about the backup camera and if the trunk would block it.

Welcome to the forum highrez58!


Generally, the rearview camera on class "b" vans is as Mike states. High up in the center brake light area. Check with your dealer to be sure, but a "Stowaway" should not be "in the way".
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Old 06-09-2020, 12:56 PM   #53
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We'll be taking possession of a 2020 Beyond 22RB in the next few days. I was thinking about a Stowaway 2 since we had one on a Casita travel trailer and it worked well. I had wondered about the backup camera and if the trunk would block it.
I don't know, But - so what if it does? You can install one for $50 or more and have the Stowaway 2. That is peanuts, a tiny percentage increase in price for a terrific B.

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Old 06-09-2020, 04:38 PM   #54
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Would any of you please explain how your battery systems work (please state what system you have) at running the fridge for extended boondocks. We live in Montana, don't always drive it every day and often park in the shade, or have grey days where the solar may not be very helpful. Currently thinking the original system with 100 watt solar and 2 smaller batteries would not work, thinking maybe the 330 ah AGM might work, and afraid of cold weather with the lithium, also the price tag of the lithium. We've been trying to find a 22D and love everything about it except that it doesn't have a propane fridge, which we feel for our needs would be best. Thanks for any insight.
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Old 06-09-2020, 06:26 PM   #55
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Would any of you please explain how your battery systems work (please state what system you have) at running the fridge for extended boondocks. We live in Montana, don't always drive it every day and often park in the shade, or have grey days where the solar may not be very helpful. Currently thinking the original system with 100 watt solar and 2 smaller batteries would not work, thinking maybe the 330 ah AGM might work, and afraid of cold weather with the lithium, also the price tag of the lithium. We've been trying to find a 22D and love everything about it except that it doesn't have a propane fridge, which we feel for our needs would be best. Thanks for any insight.
I have two 110AH AGM batteries and the factory 200W GoPower solar in a 2019 Crossfit/Beyond with the standard 6cu ft Nova Kool compressor fridge and propane stovetop. No inverter, no TV, no laptops - and very, very sparse power use other than the fridge. The fridge uses enough power that the 200w solar will probably not fully recharge the batteries during the day even when in full sun, so some generator or engine idling will be necessary each day.

My recent testing indicates that the 220 AH AGM battery setup will keep the fridge running overnight the first night, and the 2 x 100W OEM panels will partially charge the batteries during the next day, but on the second night the batteries will not be charged enough to keep the fridge running all night.

Hence the addition of a lithium battery (removable in winter) and recently two 110W portable solar panels. The lithium charges at a faster rate, so less idling or generator is required in poor weather or shade, and the additional solar should have capacity to fully recover the batteries in good weather.
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Old 06-29-2020, 06:05 AM   #56
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I'll start this thread and jot down a few comments on my CrossFit. Feel free to hijack it for any Crossfit related topics.

I have a 2019 CrossFit since October & have a few thousand miles and a dozen and a half nights in it. Here's my thoughts (as of now).

Transit chassis:

Compared to a circa 2015 half-ton pickup, it's rough riding, noisy, under powered, and wanders all over the road on windy days. I had the toe-in adjusted to try and help. I have no idea how it compares to other cargo vans. It's the only one I've driven since I got rid of my 1981 Chevy van thirty years ago.

Seating and driver position is OK for me, but not for my petite wife. Adjustable pedals and/or the 10-way seat would help a lot.

On my 2019, I have no Sync3 or lane keeping. Both would be nice. I'd prefer Sync3 and steering wheel controls to the Kenwood that Coachmen installs. There is nothing special about that Kenwood. Actually, it kind of sucks.

Dual RW, 2-wheel drive, 4.10 open differential:

Mine doesn't have a locking diff. So far this winter (very mild, very little snow) it's been about as good in the snow as an ordinary RWD pickup. The stock tires on the 350HD are Hankook's, which for me have adequate traction in snow considering they are only all-seasons. I'm not in the mountains though - it's pretty flat around here.

I'm paying attention to the after market locking differential market and eyeing up Nokians just in case.

Ford 3.7:

Adequate. Having owned a 3.5l egoboost F150, it's under powered. But it's still more than adequate for what's approaching a 9000lb vehicle. The 6spd seems to be a decent transmission. I like Ford's hill descent, tow/haul and shift buttons. Better/simpler and more intuitive than Chevy.

FWIW - I'm getting an indicated 15mpg over 4000 miles. I figure that as heavy as it is, and with dual wheels and at 8500-9000lbs, that's fair enough.

The coach:

I like the space behind the driver seat, the option for either E/W or N/S sleeping, the coach build quality, fit/finish, etc. It's well designed, well thought out, well laid out, and very usable. They put alot of thought into minor things that make life easier.

I like the passenger-side galley - the side that has the most window is the side that usually faces the campsite.

Coachmen uses factory Ford windows from the passenger van, which look great and are functional. The design allows for lots and lots of light - something that is essential for us. They don't tip out though, so venting the campervan in the rain will be hard.

The fresh water and plumbing is inside the camper & presumably a bit less temperature sensitive. I camp year-around in Minnesota & like the idea that I can keep it wet a bit longer in fall and earlier in spring. I'm watching the temperature inside the walls where the fresh water is plumbed, to see how cold they get vs. the outside temp.

The Truma is slick. This is the first time that I've not had to trip over electric heaters in the aisle when winter camping. But Coachmen didn't put a bypass on the Truma, so it's annoying to winterize.

The sewer connections are neatly hidden under the running board and don't hang down too far, but as a result are tough to get to without going on hands & knees. The sewer hose storage was hanging down below the rear bumper and looked like it would drag pretty easily, so I moved it up under the passenger side running board. Now it's even harder to get to than the sewer connections.

Batteries:

Poor, poor, and poor - considering it has a large compressor fridge and a sizable parasitic power draw. There is no way that I can keep either the fridge or the Truma furnace fan going overnight without hitting the 12.2 volt automatic battery disconnect. The stock coach batteries are lead acid 105ah, and either because they are already shot or because its cold outside, I'm not getting anywhere near the expected amp-hours. They are up under the rear fenders behind the rear axle, so even getting at them is a PITA.

I'm assuming that new AGM's under the coach combined with some lithium inside the coach will get me decent battery life.

Storage:

Lots of overheads and drawers, but very little cargo space other than that. The space behind the couch is all that's available for camping gear & bedding. The fresh tank takes up the space under the couch and the benches have power and heat under them. The space behind the drivers seat is usable though.

The manufacturer:

Coachmen was very responsive to an e-mail request for a cabinet part that got lost and an e-mail inquiry about the coach batteries. The former showed up in the mail a week later, and the latter was addressed by the engineer who designed the coach calling me directly about an hour after I initiated the query. That was unexpected. kudos to Coachmen's 'B' team.

It's a Class B:

I've been tent camping for fifty years and have had a travel trailer for a handful of years, but this is my first cargo van/class B. We're still figuring out how to shrink down to the available space and how to get along without a separate vehicle. I'm used to a pickup bed full of camping junk, so this is a change for me. I'll have to figure out if a cargo box is the way to go. Not sure yet.

It's tough to track down all the rattles. Ugh...who ever thought is was a smart idea to drive down the road with your kitchen six feet behind your ear.
Michael,
We too have a Coachman Crossfit. Your review was very accurate and complete. We are struggling with the battery and often do not have adequate power when off the grid. What did you do to address the battery issue?
Kathy
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Old 06-29-2020, 01:41 PM   #57
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Michael,
We too have a Coachman Crossfit. Your review was very accurate and complete. We are struggling with the battery and often do not have adequate power when off the grid. What did you do to address the battery issue?
Kathy
I vented the fridge in an attempt to improve it's cooling performance and reduce its energy use.

https://www.classbforum.com/forums/f...html#post98136

I added a 100AH lithium battery and dedicated battery charger.

I normally run the coach off the house AGM batteries, and switch to the lithium right before going to bed. In the morning the lithium is about 1/3-1/2 discharged. I charge both during the day with solar, Transit alternator or both.

Here's the story:

https://www.classbforum.com/forums/f...html#post97150

https://www.classbforum.com/forums/f...html#post97460

https://www.classbforum.com/forums/f...tml#post106961

More info here:

https://devhda.wordpress.com/category/campervan/

and here:

https://devhda.wordpress.com/campervan-electrical/

I've since bought and tested 220W of portable solar so that I have a better chance to recharge during the day. With the additional panels and good sun, I can recharge both the AGM's and lithium in a few hours. In bad weather or dense shade I will still have to run the engine/alternator for a while each day.

Let me know if you have any more questions.
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Old 06-29-2020, 05:39 PM   #58
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If you drive every day (like us) the compressor fridge isn't much of a problem. That being said, I upgraded from 75ah x 2 lead acid batteries to 100Ah x 2 lithiums so that we can last more than one night. Cold is not a problem where I live and I've relocated the batteries inside. But for boondocking with a compressor fridge, battery capacity is a problem without a source of recharge, so I can understand those who still prefer the absorption fridge.

Now that I've finally gotten my Onan generator running dependably and given the fast charge rate that lithium batteries can accept, I can recharge on 1-2 hours of generator per day given my 75AH charging ability. And I'd only need to do that every 2nd or 3rd day if we are conservative on use. But then, I've worked hard to stop parasitic drains and run everything on 12 volts so the only time the inverter is on is when using the microwave.
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Old 06-29-2020, 05:55 PM   #59
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It appears this is a 6cf frig, and probably two gp27 batteries or other at about 200+ah?


Frig will probably use 60-80ah per day in that size, and maybe more if venting is poor. That is about the usable capacity of on battery or a bit less, if the batteries are in good condition and they are truly getting charged full. If they are only getting to the, way to often found, 80% full it certainly would be one batteries capacity. If running heat overnight or other things during the evening, one night could be the limit very easily, and then you would need a full recharge which would take a lot of time to recover to totally full and probably wouldn't happen if offgrid.


It would probably be good to get a battery monitor in these units, so you can see where the power is going and how much real capacity the batteries have. The big frig with normal batteries is a pretty poor design, IMO, but maybe there trying to force everyone into getting the Li3 option.
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Old 06-29-2020, 06:06 PM   #60
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It appears this is a 6cf frig, and probably two gp27 batteries or other at about 200+ah?


Frig will probably use 60-80ah per day in that size, and maybe more if venting is poor. That is about the usable capacity of on battery or a bit less, if the batteries are in good condition and they are truly getting charged full. If they are only getting to the, way to often found, 80% full it certainly would be one batteries capacity. If running heat overnight or other things during the evening, one night could be the limit very easily, and then you would need a full recharge which would take a lot of time to recover to totally full and probably wouldn't happen if offgrid.


It would probably be good to get a battery monitor in these units, so you can see where the power is going and how much real capacity the batteries have. The big frig with normal batteries is a pretty poor design, IMO, but maybe there trying to force everyone into getting the Li3 option.
booster, if I'm recalling correctly the present Beyond's one agm is 260 amps. I recently heard the pro-air ac running on that battery! 200 watts of solar is available. The rb floorplan has a smaller refer.
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